Arts

Arts and culture

Editor's note: This post is about chefs and they can be quite coarse when they talk. Don't be surprised by a little foul language.

In these acrimonious times, many restaurants are treading the fine line between hospitality and politics. Anxiety-inducing though it might be, restaurants have found themselves in this awkward position before.

Just ask Jeremiah Tower, one of America's most influential chefs, who faced a similarly sticky situation four decades ago.

Dani Shapiro's new memoir, Hourglass, opens on a scene from a marriage: On a winter's day, Shapiro looks out a window of her old house in Connecticut, and spots her husband. Now pushing 60, he is standing in the driveway in his bathrobe, his pale legs stuffed into galoshes, aiming a rifle at the woodpecker, who for months has been jackhammering holes into the side of their house.

Well, we finally have a terrific show for kids under 12 and in fact, have a marvelous show for anyone still living. It’s called Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which opened last night at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater, and it would make Gene Wilder smile even if Willy Wonka is no longer with us.

There's not much point in writing a review or talking about Hello, Dolly! since even if I told you it is fantastic (which it is), you can’t buy a ticket for under $5,000. Well, maybe $10,000. Not to worry, seeing Bette Midler playing Dolly is worth every penny of that sum. But hold on, there’s lots more to love about this revival of Jerry Herman’s best musical which first showed up on Broadway in 1964.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RAY SUAREZ, HOST:

Pages