Arts

Book Reviews
5:47 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Book Review: 'Angels Make Their Hope Here'

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 6:18 pm

Alan Cheuse reviews Angels Make Their Hope Here, by Breena Clarke.

Author Interviews
3:34 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

How Scientists Created A Typhus Vaccine In A 'Fantastic Laboratory'

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:16 pm

When Germany invaded the Soviet Union during World War II, Nazi commanders had another worry besides the Red Army. Epidemics of typhus fever, which is transmitted by body lice, killed untold numbers of soldiers and civilians during and after World War I.

As World War II raged, typhus reappeared in war-torn areas and in Jewish ghettos, where cramped, harsh conditions were a perfect breeding ground for lice.

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Monkey See
12:28 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

'Audience Measurement': How Networks And Critics Are Wrestling With Numbers

iStockphoto

If the Television Critics Association press tour of 2014, wrapping up Tuesday and Wednesday with presentations from PBS, has had a catchphrase, it's "audience measurement."

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Commentary
8:03 am
Tue July 22, 2014

What 'The Golden Girls' Taught Us About AIDS

In true kick-ass Golden Girls fashion, Rose (Betty White, from left) Dorothy (Bea Arthur) and Blanche (Rue McClanahan) showed us how utterly human we all are at any age.
AP

"Dammit, why is this happening to me? I mean, this shouldn't happen to people like me."

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Book Reviews
7:34 am
Tue July 22, 2014

London Through The Eyes Of Dickens In 'The Victorian City'

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:20 pm

In September 1777, Samuel Johnson declared to his friend James Boswell, "When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life."

Johnson actually was referring to his hectic social calendar, but he did have a point. The city he was discussing was on course to become the largest metropolis the world had ever seen. In 1800, London was home to 1 million residents. By 1911 that number had grown to a staggering 7 million: a population far greater than Paris, Berlin, St. Petersburg and Moscow combined at that time.

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