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Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney picked up two big endorsements this week from GOP foreign policy luminaries: former Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and George Shultz.

At this point in the presidential race, endorsements are pretty routine. But these particular endorsements are important, since Romney has encountered some skepticism from foreign policy experts in his party.

Some Republicans expected the long, bloody wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to alter their party's traditional interventionist view. Those Republicans are disappointed in Romney.

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Wal-Mart, the world's biggest retailer, says it's leaving the American Legislative Exchange Council, known as ALEC. The conservative organization of state legislators and corporate lobbyists has drawn criticism for advocating Stand Your Ground laws and strict voter ID standards. NPR's Peter Overby reports.

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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Three presidents were reunited at the White House today. The occasion was the unveiling of two new portraits of George and Laura Bush. The paintings by Austin, Texas native John Howard Sanden will hang near those of George Bush's parents, who were also on hand for the ceremony. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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Next Tuesday, a very unusual election will put conservative Republican Tea Party politics to a test. Wisconsin's Republican governor, Scott Walker, faces a recall vote. His opponent is the Democrat he defeated in 2010, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett. Wisconsin Democrats petitioned for Walker's recall after his aggressive stance against public employee collective bargaining rights. As we've reported here, money is flowing into the race. Nearly $60 million has been spent, about three quarters of that sum by the Republicans.

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