Science

Shots - Health News
9:23 am
Wed August 20, 2014

What Kids' Drawings Say About Their Future Thinking Skills

Researchers asked 4-year-olds to draw a child. Here's a sample of their artwork.
Twins Early Development Study/King's College in London

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 2:00 pm

At age 4, many young children are just beginning to explore their artistic style.

The kid I used to babysit in high school preferred self-portraits, undoubtedly inspired by the later works of Joan Miro. My cousin, a prolific young artist, worked almost exclusively on still lifes of 18-wheelers.

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:03 am
Wed August 20, 2014

If You're Born In The Sky, What's Your Nationality? An Airplane Puzzler

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 9:52 am

Here's a puzzle I bet you've never pondered.

Imagine you are very, very pregnant. For the purposes of this mind game, you are a married American woman (with an American spouse) and you are about to board a plane and, pregnant as you are, they let you on.

Your flight, on Lufthansa Airlines, will leave Frankfurt, Germany, and travel nonstop to the Maldive Islands in the Indian Ocean. Germany is cold, wet and unhappy-making, and you crave the aquamarine waters, the balmy skies of the Maldives.

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Goats and Soda
5:46 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 8:37 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.

The type of Ebola causing the outbreak โ€” called Zaire โ€” is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That's about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.

So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?

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Shots - Health News
3:35 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Mental Health Cops Help Reweave Social Safety Net In San Antonio

Officers Ned Bandoske (left) and Ernest Stevens are part of San Antonio's mental health squad โ€” a six-person unit that answers the frequent emergency calls where mental illness may play a role.
Jenny Gold Kaiser Health News

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 9:33 am

It's almost 4 p.m., and police officers Ernest Stevens and Ned Bandoske have been driving around town in their unmarked black SUV since early this morning. The officers are part of San Antonio's mental health squad โ€” a six-person unit that answers the frequent emergency calls where mental illness may be an issue.

The officers spot a call for help on their laptop from a group home across town.

"A male individual put a blanket on fire this morning," Stevens reads from the blotter. "He's arguing ... and is a danger to himself and others. He's off his medications."

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Goats and Soda
7:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Experimental Vaccine For Chikungunya Passes First Test

Marqui Ducarme is aided by his wife after catching chikungunya at his home in Port-au-Prince, May 23. The virus swept through Haiti this spring, infecting more than 40,000 people.
Marie Arago Reuters/Landov

Scientists have taken the first steps to developing a vaccine for chikungunya โ€” an emerging mosquito-borne virus that has infected more than a half million people in the Western Hemisphere this year. About 600 Americans have brought the virus to 43 states.

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