Science

The Two-Way
1:37 pm
Sat October 25, 2014

'Near-Space Dive' Sets New Skydive Record, 25 Miles Above Earth

Google vice president Alan Eustace is lifted by a balloon into the stratosphere, in a record-breaking skydive over New Mexico Friday.
Paragon Space Development Corporation Reuters /Landov

Only two years after it was broken, the world record for the highest skydive has been rewritten. Google executive Alan Eustace set a new mark Friday when he fell from an altitude of more than 135,000 feet, plummeting in a free-fall for about 5 minutes before deploying his parachute. The jump broke the record of 127,852 feet that Felix Baumgartner set in 2012.

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Global Health
7:52 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Ebola Vaccine Tester Feels A 'Real Satisfaction'

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 11:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

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Energy
4:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Wanted: Wind Turbine Mechanic — Must Be Daredevil, Skilled With Hands

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 6:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

'Freakish' Sunspot Wows Astronomers

NASA image of sunspot AR 2192
NASA

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 5:31 pm

As sunspots go, AR 2192 is, as astronomer Phil Plait has noted, "freakishly huge."

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NPR Ed
11:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Curiosity: It Helps Us Learn, But Why?

The Limbic Reward System lights up when curiosity is piqued.
LA Johnson NPR

How does a sunset work? We love to look at them, but Jolanda Blackwell wanted her 8th graders to really think about them, to wonder and question.

So Blackwell, who teaches science at Oliver Wendell Holmes Junior High in Davis, Calif., had her students watch a video of a sunset on YouTube as part of a physics lesson on motion.

"I asked them: 'So what's moving? And why?'" Blackwell says. The students had a lot of ideas. Some thought the sun was moving, others, of course, knew that a sunset is the result of the earth spinning around on its axis.

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