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Stacey Vanek Smith

Stacey Vanek Smith is the co-host of NPR's The Indicator from Planet Money. She's also a correspondent for Planet Money, where she covers business and economics. In this role, Smith has followed economic stories down the muddy back roads of Oklahoma to buy 100 barrels of oil; flew to Pune, India, to track down the man who pitched the country's dramatic currency devaluation to the prime minister; and spoke with a North Korean woman who made a small fortune smuggling artificial sweetener in from China.

Prior to coming to NPR, Smith worked for Marketplace, where she was a correspondent and fill-in host. While there, Smith was part of a collaboration with The New York Times, where she explored the relationship between money and marriage. She was also part of Marketplace's live shows, where she produced a series of pieces on getting her data mined.

Smith is a native of Idaho and grew up working on her parents' cattle ranch. She is a graduate of Princeton University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in comparative literature and creative writing. She also holds a master's in broadcast journalism from Columbia University.

Congress is on the verge of a deal that will end the partial government shutdown. But that deal will only keep the government open for a few weeks.

There's a bigger underlying issue here: Year after year, Congress fails to pass a budget in time.

Today on the show: Why this keeps happening, and why it's a problem.

Last June the price of oil was $44 a barrel. Then, it started climbing. Earlier this week, it briefly hit $70.

The price of oil is a big deal. It affects how much you pay for heating, or a gallon of gas, or a flight home.

The price of oil is also famously volatile, and in the last six or seven years it's taken an incredible ride. On today's show, we tell the story of what happened and try to figure out what it means for the future of oil prices.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The Trump administration had a plan to save the coal industry, but a panel headed by a Trump appointee rejected that plan. Stacey Vanek Smith co-hosts the Planet Money podcast The Indicator, where she's been reporting on the threats to the coal industry.

The Beigies

Jan 18, 2018

Eight times a year, the Federal Reserve publishes the Beige Book. It's a report that is, oddly, a collection of little, random anecdotes.

An example from the latest Beige Book, which dropped yesterday: "Crop yields in Central California slipped slightly at year-end, driven by the weak performance of certain nuts."

Some of these stories deliver really interesting little insights into the economy. Insights so illuminating, someone should give out prizes for the best anecdotes in the Beige Book.

So: Welcome to the first Beigie awards, brought to you by the Indicator.

The bridge to nowhere. The teapot museum. People loved to point out how congressional earmarks led to wasteful government spending. Then, in 2011, Congress dramatically restricted earmarks.

Now, Congress is considering bringing them back.

Earmarks are easy to mock. But on today's show, Jonathan Rauch of Brookings and The Atlantic argues that earmarks make democracy work better.

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