NPR News

Hispanic Heritage Month is a nationally recognized, not-quite-a-month. (It's the back half of September and the front half of October).

Welcome to the latest installment of our education news roundup. This week: student loans, HBCUs, federal education policy and more:

The Department of Education scolds an online university

Western Governors University was ineligible for federal student aid and may have to return more than $700 million, according to an audit by the U.S. Education Department's oversight branch.

President Trump traveled to Alabama Friday night to stump for his chosen candidate, Sen. Luther Strange, ahead of Tuesday's bitter GOP Senate primary.

But even he acknowledged his alliance with the appointed senator was somewhat strange given the fact that so many of his allies — such as former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, former national security aide Sebastian Gorka and former vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin — are all backing Strange's opponent, former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore.

Brazil's army says it's dispatching nearly 1,000 troops to the country's largest shanty-town – or "favela" – in the hope of ending a wave of deadly violence that began nearly one week ago.

This afternoon military trucks carrying soldiers brandishing assault weapons began rumbling up to the edge of Rocinha, a sprawl of tumble-down hillside homes, shops, narrow streets and tiny alleys in the south of Rio de Janeiro.

Well before this year's series of historically powerful hurricanes, Puerto Rico already had a notoriously fickle power supply and crushing debt — the power authority effectively declared bankruptcy in July. Power outages were routine, even in cities.

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